Conditions deteriorating on Outer Banks

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by 13News

Associated Press & 13News

Posted on October 29, 2012 at 8:26 AM

Updated Wednesday, Nov 13 at 9:21 AM

KILL DEVIL HILLS, NC - As Hurricane Sandy bears down on the East Coast, the Outer Banks was preparing for outages and major flooding.

Dare County officials said to expect soundside flooding throughout county.

For Roanoke Island – Manteo, officials expect water to be four-to-six feet above ground and that the worst will come after sunset.

Northern areas of the county were told to watch for similiar conditions and that some flooding was expected.

On mainland Dare County, Manns Harbor and Stumpy Point should expect inundation of 4 to 6 feet above ground with flooding of low lying structures. Vehicles and boats should be relocated to higher ground.

On Hatteras Island, soundside flooding will continue through the evening with 4 to 6 feet in the Rodanthe, Waves, and Salvo Villages.

Hatteras Village is without power and service is not expected to be restored until later Monday.

NC Highway 12 south of Oregon Inlet remains closed due to sand and water on the roadway. Local law enforcement reported Sunday afternoon that pavement had been compromised in the northbound lane of Highway 12 north of Mirlo Beach and in the southbound lane south of the new bridge.

Sandy was a couple of hundred miles off the North Carolina coast and the center of the storm was expected to be near the mid-Atlantic coast on Monday night.

Long portions of NC-12, the barrier island beach road between Nags Head and Duck, were covered in rain, sea water and sand. Several homes and businesses on Ocracoke Island, accessible only by boat, were threatened by a flood of more than 18 inches of water rising out of the sea.

Ilona Matteson lives in Duck. She says that this is an extremely high tide and in 20 years, she's never seen the ocean cause so much damage.

There are broken dune fences and pieces of destroyed decks litter the dunes.

About five inches of rain fell at Hatteras Village during a 24-hour period ending at 2 p.m. Sunday. On the oceanfront, the state Department of Transportation reported sustained winds of 50 mph. The greatest impacts from the ocean were expected with high tide Monday morning.

Powerful surf and extremely high tides are causing a lot of erosion along beaches in the Outer Banks. Officials say storm surge could be 7 ft above normal, putting this storm on par with some of the worst in recent years.

Flooding on the sound side of the barrier islands should occur later in the day on Monday.

 

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