Virginia Rules program aims to educate teen students about the law

Virginia Rules program aims to educate teen students about the law

Credit: AG Herring Tweet

Attorney General Mark Herring preparing to talk to school safety officials before the statewide launch of Virginia Rules program.

Print
Email
|

by 13News Now

WVEC.com

Posted on August 5, 2014 at 8:45 AM

Updated Tuesday, Aug 5 at 9:40 AM

HAMPTON -- As the new school year approaches, Attorney General Mark Herring wants to make sure middle and high school students know "Virginia Rules."  

Herring kicked off the 2014 Virginia School and Campus Safety Training Forum and State D.A.R.E. Conference in Hampton on Tuesday morning.

 

He announced the statewide launch of Virginia Rules, an  education program to help middle and high school students "make good decisions, avoid breaking laws, and become responsible, active citizens within their schools and communities."  The program has particular emphasis on how Virginia laws apply to teens.

"I'm really proud that we're making the Virginia Rules program available to educators and community leaders across the state," said Attorney General Herring. "It's a lot easier to help kids develop good decision making and life skills on the front end than to deal with the consequences on the back end. I hope we're able to reach every student in Virginia and help them become active members of their communities and responsible citizens of the Commonwealth."

Bullying, autism awareness for school administrators and law enforcement officers, gangs and human trafficking's impact on schools, active shooter and other life and death emergencies and more.  Click here for the complete agenda.

The program was piloted by Norfolk, Virginia Beach, and Fairfax County, where more than 1,000 trained instructors have taught more than 75,000 lessons in schools and community settings.

Norfolk Commonwealth's Attorney Gregory Underwood has used Virginia Rules for the past few years.

"Virginia Rules helps us reach these kids before they come through the doors so they might think twice and make better decisions. It's tough to explain complex concepts like accomplice liability even to adults, but Virginia Rules help us make it relevant to these young people."

The top five visited sections in 2014 were Child Labor Laws, Driving, Family Relationships, Alcohol and Tobacco, Crimes Against Persons, and Drugs, Herring said.  

 

Print
Email
|