NC 12 on Hatteras Island reopens Friday night, may close over weekend

NC 12 on Hatteras Island reopens Friday night, may close over weekend

Credit: NC Dept. of Transportation

Flooding on NC 12 Friday afternoon

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WVEC.com

Posted on November 12, 2010 at 11:58 AM

Updated Friday, Nov 12 at 7:16 PM

DARE CO., NC -- For the second day in a row, NC 12 was flooded by ocean overwash and officials expected it might happen over the weekend.

Highway 12 on Hatteras Island between Oregon Inlet and Rodanthe was to reopen to all vehicular traffic at 6:00 p.m. Frriday.

Friday morning, Dare County officials closed the roadway at the Oregon Inlet bridge from just south of the bridge to Rodanthe.  

Traffic was stopped at the south end of the Bonner Bridge at Oregon Inlet and just North of the Village of Rodanthe.  Travel on Hatteras Island between Rodanthe and Hatteras Village is unrestricted

Emergency management officials say there is no estimated time for re-opening the highway.

The alternate route off Hatteras Island is south through Ocracoke and ferry to mainland.

Ocracoke residents can use the Swan Quarter and Cedar Island ferries without having to pay a toll throughout the weekend.

NCDOT crews are clearing roads as quickly as possible; however, high tide cycles will continue to push water and sand onto NC 12, Dare Co. Emergency Management spokeswoman Sandy Sanderson told WVEC.com.

NC 12 on Pea Island also is closed due to strong northeast winds and abnormally high tides, which are bringing ocean waves over the road.

State highway patrol officers, sheriff's deputies and other law enforcement officers are conducting traffic control until the area is safe. 

A high surf advisory remains in effect for the Outer Banks until 7:00 a.m. Saturday.

The National Weather Services says the strong low pressure drifting east well off the Mid-Atlantic coast is expected to create nearshore seas between eight and 10 feet Friday night.

Tides also were expected to be a foot or so above normal, creating conditions for overwash and beach erision in flood-prone locations.

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