North Carolina soldier killed in Afghanistan helicopter crash

North Carolina soldier killed in Afghanistan helicopter crash

Sgt. Peter C. Bohler

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Associated Press

Posted on December 19, 2013 at 4:34 PM

Updated Thursday, Dec 19 at 10:12 PM

UPDATE DEC. 19:  The Department of Defense confirmed one of the soldiers killed Tuesday when a helicopter crashed in Afghanistan was 29-year-old Sgt. Peter C. Bohler of Willow Spring, North Carolina.

Bohler was assigned to the 3rd Assault Helicopter Battalion, 1st Aviation Regiment, 1st Combat Aviation Brigade, 1st Infantry Division, Fort Riley, Kan.

Also killed were Chief Warrant Officer 2 Randy L. Billings of Okla., Chief Warrant Officer 2 Joshua B. Silverman of Ariz., Sgt. 1st Class Omar W. Forde of Ga., Staff Sgt. Jesse L. Williams of Ind. and Spc. Terry K. D. Gordon of Miss.

WASHINGTON (AP) — Six U.S. service members were killed Tuesday when a helicopter crashed in southern Afghanistan, U.S. and NATO officials said.

One person on board the Black Hawk UH-60 was injured and survived, two U.S. defense officials said on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak on the record. The aircraft was an Army helicopter from an Army unit, but officials have not yet confirmed the identities nor the service branches of the individuals, a third official said.

A statement issued by the NATO international military coalition said the crash was under investigation and that there was no insurgent activity in the area at the time of the crash.

In Washington, an official originally said the helicopter had experienced engine failure before the crash, but later said that it was unclear whether that was the case. According to initial reports, the troops had mechanical problems, came under fire after the crash and it was unclear whether any of the casualties were the result of enemy fire.

The deputy governor of southern Zabul province, Mohammad Jan Rasoolyar, said a NATO helicopter crashed in the remote district of Shajau and U.S. officials later confirmed that Zabul was the location of the U.S. crash.

This year, 109 members of the U.S. military have died in Afghanistan, out of a total of 139 members of the coalition.

The death toll has dropped significantly since the coalition handed over responsibility for security to Afghan forces last summer and coalition troops are now training and assisting.

By comparison, 394 foreign troops died last year, including 297 Americans.

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Associated Press writers Patrick Quinn in Kabul, Mirwais Khan in Kandahar and Lolita C. Baldor in Washington contributed to this report.

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