Wakefield man accused of vandalizing cemetery, family says he's innocent

Wakefield man accused of vandalizing cemetery, family says he's innocent

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Wakefield man accused of vandalizing cemetery, family says he's innocent

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by Karen Hopkins, 13News Now

WVEC.com

Posted on December 17, 2013 at 1:59 PM

Updated Tuesday, Dec 17 at 2:17 PM

WAKEFIELD -- The family of a Wakefield man who is accused of vandalizing a Southampton County cemetery claims he is innocent.

Tony Brock's mother Barbara Meyers believes her son is not responsible for the destroyed headstones at Butts Family Cemetery on Old Hickory Road. 

"I just can’t believe this is all happening. It stresses the whole family out.  We know he is innocent; because I am the one believer that if he did something wrong, he needs to pay for it. But he didn’t do this," Meyers said.

On Monday, Southampton investigators charged Brock with intentional damage to a monument greater than $1000, injure permanent object of a cemetery and injury to a temporary object of a cemetery.

Meyers says Brock's truck broke down outside the cemetery and a worker cutting grass gave him some gas. She said Brock accidentally left a receipt and his work gloves behind and that's why deputies connected him to the vandalism case last September.

13News Now asked authorities for a comment regarding Brock's claim of innocence.

"“That will be for a judge to decide. We tied him and his vehicle to the scene through evidence we recovered," Major Gene Dewery said.

The vandalism caused about  $15,000 in damage. A group in the Sebrell community was so outraged that they collected $1,500, making the reward for information that leads to an arrest $2,500. 

Meyers thinks this large reward was another factor in her son's arrest.

“I think it has to do with the money and I think the county is being pressured to get this crime solved,” Meyers said. 

Brock has never been in trouble before and he served in the Navy, according to his wife.

"He usually volunteers to lay wreaths at the veteran cemeteries," Meyers said. 
 

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