Worker frustrated boss won't acknowledge anyone else's ideas

Worker frustrated boss won't acknowledge anyone else's ideas

Worker frustrated boss won't acknowledge anyone else's ideas

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by Rozanne "Roze" Worrell

WVEC.com

Posted on October 24, 2013 at 12:32 PM

Updated Thursday, Oct 24 at 12:57 PM

Dear Roze:

I work for a guy who is so unaware of his weaknesses. One of the biggest is his inability to accept the fact that one of his employees may have a better idea or solution to a problem than he does. Recently, I disagreed with him on the amount of data to give one of our clients I’m responsible for. We went with what he wanted to give them, but the client complained and asked for the amount of data I thought we should have pitched to them. Like always, my boss couldn’t acknowledge I was right, that I knew what was best for my client. I think he should be pleased with the fact I’m aware of and understand my client’s needs. I don’t need constant praise or accolades; it’s just that he will always dismiss an idea if it’s contrary to what he has proposed or what he thinks should be done. If this only happened once in awhile, it wouldn’t be so bad, but this is a regular occurrence and has been for many years. I need to know how my colleagues and I can get him to see the flaws in his decisions and be more open-minded and supportive of us.

Disgusted with dismissive boss

Dear Disgusted with dismissive boss: 

As you are well aware, this is far from being a healthy boss/employee work relationship. As much as it would be ideal for your boss to be able to recognize his foibles and the value of your and your colleagues’ opinions when they do not align with his, it appears that will rarely, if ever, be the way your boss handles things. 

I suggest you deal with this situation with kid gloves; you do not want to jeopardize your job. Since your boss has been like this for many years, I would continue to give him your ideas and points of view but always be sure to accompany them with supporting documentation and/or information, and, of course, always do it with utmost respect for him, his ideas, and points of view. Hopefully, there will be times when he accepts yours and your colleagues’. And if there comes a time when you can no longer handle his behavior, there is nothing wrong with looking for another job. 

Wishing you the best!


Dear Roze:

I’m seriously thinking about leaving my job in Hampton Roads so I can move back to my hometown in the western part of the state. My hometown is a lot smaller than Hampton Roads, so I may have to put up with a commute to Roanoke or even D.C. for a decent job. I’m writing you because I’d like your input about my action plan. I will be going home over the holidays and plan to put my feelers out to see what if anything is available. If it looks like the move could be feasible for me, I’ll update my resume after the holidays and send it out to prospective employers in the beginning of the New Year. What do you think?

Making plans for new job back home 
 

Dear Making plans for new job back home:

I love that you are planning ahead, but update your resume NOW! When you are back home reconnecting with old friends and acquaintances; making new contacts; and looking at places for possible employment, you want to be able to give or email your resume to those who ask for it right away. Oftentimes, people think no one is thinking about work or hiring over the holidays, but that is just not the case. And even if a company or organization does not have a job opening at the time you are talking to individuals associated with them, if they are on the ball and impressed with you, there is a good possibility they will ask you for a copy of your resume.

Best of luck!

© 2013 Rozanne R. Worrell

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