White House honors Beach girl for giving gift of running to disabled sister

White House honors Beach girl for giving gift of running to disabled sister

White House honors Beach girl for giving gift of running to disabled sister

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by 13News Now

WVEC.com

Posted on April 11, 2014 at 10:00 PM

Updated Saturday, Apr 12 at 11:08 AM

VIRGINIA BEACH -- Plaza Middle School student Briley Rossiter, author of "Born An Angel," spent Friday morning at the White House.

Briley and her family were invited to attend an event honoring the nation's military and veteran caregivers by first lady Michelle Obama and Dr. Jill Biden, wife of Vice President Joe Biden. It's all part of the Joining Forces initiative that calls on Americans to find ways to help the country's military families.

Briley, 12, has continued to gain national recognition for the book she wrote about the relationship she shares with her younger sister Ainsley, who has infantile neuraxonal dystrophy; a rare, incurable ailment that restricts her to life in a wheelchair.

Although the disease has rendered 9-year-old Ainsely disabled, INAD has failed to place limitations on the unshakable bond between the two girls.

In the book, Briley highlights the many road races she and her sister have participated in. On tracks normally punctuated with able-bodied runners, Ainsley crosses every finish line with the help of her big sister and the rest of the family. 

Dr. Jill Biden, who recently read a copy of the book, was so inspired by the story that she set out to recognize Briley for her unwavering courage and perseverance at the event Friday.

Briley's father, Maj. Kim Rossiter, was also honored. Hey said that while he is humbled by the recognition, its his kids who inspire him on a daily basis.

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"Each of our children brings my wife and me amazing joy in their own unique ways. Every day is a blessing and we cherish the moments we can spend together," said Kim Rossiter. "To watch the amazing acts of kindness and charity each of them extends and inspires is an honor."

Since Briley's book debuted nearly two years ago, it has sold more than 3,000 copies nationwide.

The tome has drawn praise from readers throughout the country with many people applauding its message of including people with disabilities in every phase of life.

Proceeds from the sale of the book support the Ainsley's Angels of America Foundation, which pays for joggers' chairs and other equipment that allows children with disabilities to participate in road races and similar athletic events in their communities.

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