Eagle Cam gives viewers rare glimpse into eagle's life at Norfolk Botanical Garden

Eagle Cam gives viewers rare glimpse into eagle's life at Norfolk Botanical Garden

Credit: WVEC.com Eagle Cam

One of the eagles in the nest at 8:05 a.m. Tuesday.

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WVEC.com

Posted on January 18, 2012 at 4:27 PM

Updated Friday, Jan 20 at 3:55 PM

NORFOLK – The WVEC.com Eagle Cam is now turned on for the sixth season.

People around the world watch the eagles at Norfolk Botanical Garden as they create the home they’ll for this year’s eaglets.

The pair had three babies in 2010 and has successfully raised 15 eaglets in their eight years at the Garden.

The nesting season typically runs from mid-to-late summer.

Staff at the Garden say early morning is a good time to see the eagles in their nest, which is in the tree near Renaissance Court and Statuary Vista at the Garden. It’s about 125 feet northwest of the previous site near NATO Tower.

The Eagle Cam is a partnership with WVEC.com, Norfolk Botanical Garden and the Va. Department of Game and Inland Fisheries.

Perhaps the most well-known of the eagles born at the Garden is Buddy, who is nearly three years old and is now in training at the Wildlife Center of Virginia in Waynesboro to be an education animal.

He hatched in late April 2008 and was admitted to the Center on May 22 with a golf-ball-sized mass on the left side of its beak.  Because of it, the eagle cannot be returned to the wild. 

He gets monthly beak trims to corrrect problems caused by the Avian Pox -- the most recent on January 6.

On January 29 at the Wild Birds Unlimited store in Hilltop West Shopping Center in Va. Beach, the Center's Claire Thain will conduct a program on Training Raptors.  She'll talk about training Buddy, how he's progressing and will share a slide presentation on her work with the young Bald Eagle.

While he's not ready to make his public debut, she'll be bringing along Scarlette, a red-tailed hawk and Misty, a barred owl, officials stated.

Thain says she started training Buddy full-time in October 2010 and hopes to see him getting comfortable in front of the public by late spring.

“Buddy is one of my top challenges and takes time and dedication to get him comfortable staying on the glove for long periods of time. It is really important to be consistent with him—and to have patience too! We’ve had our ups and downs together—sometimes he does exactly what’s asked of him, and other times he’s extremely headstrong. I learn new techniques and regularly consult with other eagle trainers as Buddy’s training progresses,” she told WVEC.com.

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