Worried about co-worker's inappropriate Facebook posts

Worried about co-worker's inappropriate Facebook posts

Worried about co-worker's inappropriate Facebook posts

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by Rozanne "Roze" Worrell

WVEC.com

Posted on November 22, 2011 at 4:50 PM

Dear Roze:

I need to vent!  I have a co-worker whose posts on Facebook aren’t what I consider appropriate.  I realize she’s posting to people who are supposed to be her friends, but everyone knows that others can see or be told what’s being posted on your wall.  It blows me away the way she cusses and makes snide comments about people.  Some may say I should mind my own business since none of her posts relate to work, but what she does outside the office not only reflects poorly on her but on our employer and all of us who work at the same place.  We have one boss, the owner, and six of us employees in the company, so it’s not like we have an HR or personnel department.  I don’t want to say anything to our boss or the other co-workers about this.  I like her, but what she’s doing is in poor taste and I’d like her to tone it down.  What can I do?

Worried about Facebook fallout

Dear Worried about Facebook fallout:

Understanding why you do not want to take the matter to your boss or co-workers, your only options are to either have a one-on-one with the person or to ignore the situation.  If you decide to speak to her, be calm and nonjudgmental when you explain your concerns with her posts.  Let her know that you are just trying to be helpful.  If you choose not to say anything to her, assist yourself by unfriending her or unsubscribing to her updates. 

Dear Roze:

I recently started my own business, and when I told my friends about it, I told them that I would give them 50 percent off the first time I did work for them.  I’ve had some time to think about this, and I’ve come to the realization that giving such a big discount would not be a smart move economically, and quite a few of these friends are very well off and can easily afford my services.  So, my question to you is when my friends want me to do some work for them, if they don’t bring up the pricing, would it be okay if I gave them a smaller discount?

Rethinking my offer

Rethinking my offer:

Absolutely not!  Although I understand why you have changed your mind on the pricing for your friends, it is critical that you honor that discount if you want to keep your and your business’s reputation intact.  That being said, it goes without saying that if you do an outstanding job for these individuals, they will use you again and refer you to others, which will hopefully make up for the steep discounts you gave them initially.  And there is always the possibility that some of your friends will choose to pay full price.

Dear Roze:

I’m feeling very conflicted.  I accepted a job offer with a start date in less than three weeks from a company that’s in the same line of work I’ve been in for 15 years.  This kind of work is very stressful in that it’s based on the procuring of contracts.  When we don’t get a contract, there’s a possibility I can lose my job.  Another company I was interviewing with at the same time as this one just gave me an offer.  This second company’s business is totally different from what I’ve been doing, but I’d prefer to work for it because there’s so much more security with it than the other one.  I want to do what’s right, and I want to work in a more stable environment which would be better for me and my family of which I’m the sole breadwinner.  Do you think it’s okay if I back out of the first offer?

Job offer dilemma

Dear Job offer dilemma:

Some may advise you that you should stick with the first job offer, pointing to the fact that you would not like it if a company decided to take back an offer it had given you.  But if the second offer is definite and you have examined the situation thoroughly and know in your gut that the second offer is what is best for you and your family, then back out of the first offer graciously.  Telephonically contact your point of contact immediately and sincerely apologize for the inconvenience your decision may have on the company, but explain that in all good conscience you need to back out of it.  Then, follow-up your call with a handwritten note.  No employer wants a person working for them who has no interest or desire to be there.

© 2011 Rozanne R. Worrell

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