Dropped freelancer questions company's decision

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by Rozanne "Roze" Worrell

WVEC.com

Posted on December 9, 2009 at 2:59 PM

Updated Wednesday, Dec 9 at 3:58 PM

Dear Roze:

I was doing freelance work for a company for over four years, and then out of the blue they dropped me.  I didn’t find out until after the fact, at which time, I inquired why this was done.  They apologized for dropping the ball and were complimentary and appreciative of my work, but said they didn’t need my services because they were moving in a different direction, not because of my fees.  Initially, I was very upset but eventually got over it.  Now it seems that even though they made some significant changes to their platform, their new direction didn’t require termination of my services.  I’m also aware that I wasn’t replaced.  I can’t understand why they let me go and fed me that bull.  I want them to know that I know they weren’t honest with me.  I don’t expect to get the business back, but I don’t want them to think they got away with it.  Your thoughts?

-Don’t lie to me

Dear Don’t lie to me:

Although I sympathize with you and do not condone the company’s lack of proper notification, I cannot support you re-contacting them.  Regrettably, the company was neither forthcoming nor transparent concerning your dismissal, but you do not want to risk burning this bridge.  

Dear Roze:

I’m struggling with my boss’s insecurities and inability to give me credit for my work.  She had me stand in for her at some major negotiation meetings.  Afterwards, I briefed her and then she briefed her boss, the general manager, and those managers equal to her, so it looked like she conducted the successful negotiations.  When I subtly asked her if the GM knew I attended the meetings, she smirked, “Oh, it didn’t come up.”  She plays dumb when it’s to her disadvantage.  Talking to her about this would do NO good; only make her feel more threatened by me.  I don’t need or expect her to appreciate my work; I just want acknowledgement and credit for it.  Any suggestions?

-Want deserved credit

Dear Want deserved credit:

You know the nuances of your situation better than anyone.  From my perspective, you have two options.  Ideally, the first option would be to follow-up your briefing with an email addressed to your boss, copying the GM and whoever else should be in the know, which documents your efforts at those negotiations.  If you believe such a communication would be detrimental to your career, your second option would be to continue to do your work well and hopefully, the necessary parties will become aware of it sooner than later.

Dear Roze:

I’ve been a state employee for over 12 years.  I’m a mid-level supervisor, so I understand and adhere to the chain of command.  Recently, one of our “directors” advised a group of us, which included my boss, that she had an open door policy and welcomed visits from us.  I took her at her word and paid her a visit.  Big mistake on my part even though I didn’t say anything I wouldn’t tell my boss.  She was civil during the meeting, but right after it, my boss called me and said she called him wanting to know why I came to see her.  He handled it by telling me to never go to her again.  I feel like I messed up with both of them.

-Open door policy is farce

Dear Open door policy is farce:

Sadly, it appears that the director’s open door policy announcement was a hollow offer.  Just as disappointing was your boss’s silence when he was contacted by her.  You, however, did nothing wrong.  That said, honor your boss’s request and if it is appropriate and not too late, emphasize to him the insignificance of your visit with the director. 

© 2009 Rozanne R. Worrell

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