Worker worried about coworker's tendency to lie

Worker worried about coworker's tendency to lie

Worker worried about coworker's tendency to lie

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by Rozanne "Roze" Worrell

WVEC.com

Posted on August 2, 2011 at 3:16 PM

Updated Tuesday, Aug 2 at 4:21 PM

Dear Roze:

I started working with a guy in my office that has lied to me about a couple of things.  I don’t think lying is ever a good thing.  These lies were over minor things but they make me question what else he may not have been honest about since he started with us, and whether or not I have to worry about what he tells me down the line.  I can’t understand why he felt like he had to lie.  I don’t know if I’ll be able to trust him with the things that are real significant or with anything for that matter.  Should I do anything?  What would you do?

Keeping one eye open

Dear Keeping one eye open:

Depending upon the personality of this person and your relationship with him, you can either have a respectful but frank talk with him about his untruthful remarks, or you can say nothing.  If you believe he is approachable and you have a decent relationship with him, have the talk.  Otherwise, keep the information to yourself but let his behavior be your guide in all your dealings with him.

Dear Roze:

I’m currently employed and I’m satisfied with my job, but I want to see what else is out there and if I’m still competitive.  So, I’ve been applying for other jobs and have gone on several interviews.  If I got a really good offer, I might accept it and give my current employer a two-week notice.  I haven’t told anyone at my current place of employment that I’m searching except for the one person I’m closest to and feel that I can trust.  He knows I’ll kill him if he breathes a word about my looking.  I’m writing you because of an issue I have with some of the businesses I’ve interviewed with.  When I’ve gone for an interview, there will be several other people in the lobby waiting to be interviewed for the same job I’m there for.  I have this huge fear of running into someone I know and it getting out that I’m interviewing.  As you can imagine, I definitely don’t want my boss or co-workers to find out I’m doing this.  I can’t understand why employers would handle the interview process like this.  What do you suggest I say if my boss finds out?

Fear of getting caught

Dear Fear of getting caught:

I agree with you.  It is more respectful of the job candidates and makes the most sense for employers to space out their interviews.  And although it does not make it right, oftentimes, employers handle the interviews in the way you described because they have a limited amount of time to conduct them.  Regardless, you need to be prepared for the possibility of your boss finding out. 

I truly believe “Honesty is the best policy.”  Be forthright if the issue comes up.  As you indicated in your email to me, let your boss know you are satisfied with your current job, but you are interested in finding out how marketable and competitive you are in the job market.  Ideally, he will consider your actions as a smart assessment of your career goals and not as a personal affront, a lot of which will depend upon his personality and your relationship with him.  Regardless, it would be understandable and not unusual for your actions to cause some concern on his part.  Best of luck!

Dear Roze:

I am often asked to talk to young people who are in high school or college about my career and/or the educational path I took to get to my career, and I’m amazed at how ill-prepared they are.  It’s down right depressing to hear the recorded messages on their personal phones, how they answer their phones, and their lack of ability to ask or answer questions.  I don’t think my expectations are too high.  I don’t mind helping our young people but they need to do their part too.  Our future workforce looks mighty pitiful from where I stand.  Please print my email!

Concerned about our future workforce

Dear Concerned about our future workforce:

Unfortunately, you have some valid concerns, but thankfully, I have also had some good experiences in helping our youth with their future careers.  It is smart for our youth to find people who are willing to impart some of their career wisdom, but it is equally important for them to show their appreciation for the sharing of this wisdom by demonstrating mature behavior and being well prepared.  Thank you for sharing your experience.

© 2011 Rozanne R. Worrell

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