Tired of co-worker's behavior

Tired of co-worker's behavior

Tired of co-worker's behavior

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by Rozanne "Roze" Worrell

WVEC.com

Posted on June 8, 2010 at 1:26 PM

Updated Tuesday, Jun 8 at 1:42 PM

Dear Roze:

A guy in my office not only plays computer games with the volume up but also takes naps in his cubicle in the middle of the afternoon.  We, his co-workers, make wisecracks to his face but it doesn’t faze him.  Our supervisor knows what’s going on but chooses to ignore it.  We think it’s because this guy is a pompous jerk.  But our boss’s lack of taking action makes him as bad as our co-worker.  It’s hard to stay motivated and it’s impossible to respect either one of them.  Help!

Snuff out the inappropriate behavior

Dear Snuff out the inappropriate behavior:

There is power in numbers.  I suggest that you and one of your co-workers try to have a frank but respectful discussion with your co-worker.  If it falls on deaf ears, at least two of you should ask your boss to handle it.  Explain how your co-worker’s behavior is not only distracting and unprofessional but how it also lowers everyone’s morale and productivity.  Be sure he knows that you tried to remedy the matter on your own.

Dear Roze:


I recently met a guy through a mutual acquaintance and when it became apparent that we were in a similar line of work, he volunteered that he would be interviewing with a company that “wanted” him for a particular position.  This news took me completely by surprise because I had just been called to schedule an interview for the same position.  He made it sound like the job was his for the taking.  So, in that split second, I decided not to tell him about my interview.  I didn’t want it to appear that I was trying to show him up.  What do I do if I get an offer, decide to take it, and run into this guy again?

What do I do?

Dear What do I do?:

There are a lot of “ifs” with your situation - if you get the offer, if you take it, and if you cross paths with this guy again.  If all this happens, I would be honest and respectfully tell him exactly what you communicated to me in your email.

Dear Roze:

I know it’s a buyer’s market in real estate right now.  Similarly, an employer has the upper hand in the job market.  But employers should be fair with job candidates.  An assistant for a company’s administrator called to schedule me for an interview.  She said it would last an hour to an hour and a half, nothing more.  It lasted a lot longer and was much more than an interview.  I was there for over three hours and in addition to the interview, I had a multiple choice test, essay questions, and several computer skills tests.  I wasn’t prepared for all that.  Do you think this was fair?

Tell me everything
 
Dear Tell me everything:

Employers have varying perspectives on how transparent their hiring process should be.  There is also the possibility that the person scheduling your interview has limited knowledge about the interview, or will only provide you with the information you request.  Regardless of the situation, it is important for you to be proactive and to ascertain as much information as possible.  Oftentimes, a job’s description and its listed requirements will not only give you insight into what to expect if you are hired, but will help you prepare for whatever oral and/or written responses may be required from you during the interview process.  Best of luck!  Hang in there!

© 2010 Rozanne R. Worrell

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