Retiree angered by former co-worker who put him off

Retiree angered by former co-worker who put him off

Retiree angered by former co-worker who put him off

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by Rozanne "Roze" Worrell

WVEC.com

Posted on January 18, 2011 at 4:53 PM

Updated Tuesday, Jan 18 at 5:41 PM

Dear Roze:
 
I’m ticked off with a guy I used to work with.  We both recently retired; he wants a second career and I’m just looking for part-time work.  About three months ago, he asked me to write a recommendation for him, which I jumped on right away.  I wouldn’t have handled it any other way.  Then a few weeks ago, I received a request from a businesswoman I don’t know but I knew my old colleague did.  So, I left him a phone message requesting a call back to let me know if she was a decent person to work with.  When a week passed with no response, I sent him an email, making the same request and letting him know that I left him a voice mail, in case he didn’t get it.  He emailed me later that day, saying he got my voice message and that he would call me soon.  A week and a half have since passed, and he still hasn’t called.  I realize we all get busy, but seriously.  I consider him a good friend, not just a former co-worker.
 
Let me know something

Dear Let me know something:

Given the time that has passed, it appears that a simple thumbs up or thumbs down would suffice.  I suggest you shoot your former co-worker another email.  Tell him that time is of the essence and that you only need a yes or no response as to the businesswoman’s decency; and when it is convenient for him, he can provide you with more detail.

Dear Roze:

I am one of our company’s four managers who attend our CEO’s monthly strategic meetings.  His administrative assistant is present to take minutes and type them up.  We, the managers, are required to review what she types up for accuracy, grammar, typos, etc.  I’m frustrated because I’m the only one who does the review.  Everyone else tells the administrative assistant that they concur with my edits.  I admit I’m the most thorough and detailed of the managers, but I feel like they’re dumping on me.  When I’ve said something to them, they just laugh it off and say I’m the best at doing it.  What should I do?

Stuck with all the work

Dear Stuck with all the work:

It sounds like you care about the quality of these monthly meeting minutes, but you are tired of the other managers taking advantage of your hard work.  I suggest that you go back to your colleagues and be more firm about needing them to contribute more to the review process.  If you see no change, take the matter to the CEO.  Explain to him that the other managers need to be more a part of the review, or request that he make you the only manager responsible for doing it.  Be sure he knows that you have tried to remedy the situation on your own.  On a side note, I cannot help but wonder about the quality of what you receive from the administrative assistant.  It sounds like you are spending more time reviewing these minutes than you should have to.

Dear Roze:

I’m sick of getting major requests in emails from people who hardly know me.  I prefer a phone call or one-on-one if they’re local.  For example, I’ve been asked to run for an office in an industry association, chair a committee, and sponsor an event, all in emails.  I don’t think these kinds of requests should be asked in this manner.  They usually require more than a “yes” or “no” response, especially when the response is negative.  In such instances, I want to provide a thoughtful explanation and I find that very difficult to do in an email.  It may seem like I’m making excuses, especially if the requestor doesn’t know me that well.  What do you think?

Pick up the phone or come see me

Dear Pick up the phone or come see me:

Although I understand your position, I can also see the positive side to receiving such requests in emails.  It may be preferred by others because it gives them time to consider the request and not feel like they are being put on the spot.  And regardless of whether it is considered a good or bad thing, I am seeing more business being conducted electronically than ever before.  All that being said, the next time you receive a major request in an email, reply that you appreciate his/her communication but given its significance, you would like to discuss the matter over the telephone or face-to-face.

© 2011 Rozanne R. Worrell
 

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