Recent graduate's first job not what they expected

Recent graduate's first job not what they expected

Recent graduate's first job not what they expected

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by Rozanne "Roze" Worrell

WVEC.com

Posted on July 5, 2011 at 2:39 PM

Updated Friday, Jul 8 at 11:51 AM

Dear Roze:

I graduated from college in May, and started my first official job working for a PR firm shortly thereafter.  I’m being paid very little but I was told before I started that my first three months are like a probation period.  I was also told that if my performance meets the firm’s expectations by the end of the summer, I will get a bump in my salary.  Big problem – I HATE my supervisor and the work!  My boss is a pompous a#* and I do more clerical work than PR work.  My boss treats me more like a secretary than an account representative.  It’s only been about six weeks, but I don’t think I can make it here much longer.  What should I do? 

Ready to move on

Dear Ready to move on:

First and foremost, do not leave your job without having secured another one.  Second, make sure that you are being honest with yourself as to why you want to change jobs.  More often than not, people leave their jobs because of their issue(s) with the person they work for, not because of their actual work responsibilities.  And third, typically, the probationary period is a time when new employees must prove themselves capable of doing the job for which they were hired, so you may be given a variety of tasks.  Take some time for introspection and if you still want to leave, I suggest you have a face-to-face with your supervisor.  If you were provided with a job description and/or a list of expectations, review one or both with him/her.  If neither exists, provide him/her with a verbal and written overview of your responsibilities as you understand them, as well as your short and long term goals at the firm.  Hopefully, this one-on-one will lead to a meeting of the minds and you will want to give the job and your boss more time. 

Also, never lose sight of four very important points.  One, you are gaining valuable work experience with this job which you will be able to document in your resume; two, if you leave this or any other job, never burn your bridges; three, the phrase, “the grass is always greener on the other side of the fence,” is not always true; and four, bosses quite often come and go.

Hang in there!

Dear Roze:

I’m fed up with the young people I work with.  My employer is in the service industry, so it’s not uncommon for emergencies to arise with our customers from time to time that require immediate action.  That means someone’s lunch time may be interrupted or one of us may have to do something that doesn’t fall in line with our actual roles in the office.  The young workers either ignore the times things come up or just refuse to help out.  Us baby boomers are disgusted by their uppity attitudes and resent having to do so much of the work, but we’re reluctant to go to the owners because one of these uppity young people happens to be their daughter.  It’s obvious the owners are aware that this goes on with their daughter and the other Millennials, but they don’t care because they know us old farts will always get things done.  And just so you know, the owners handle all the office’s HR matters.  Is there anything we can do?

Fed up baby boomer

Dear Fed up baby boomer: 

The old phrase, “there’s strength in numbers,” most definitely applies to your situation.  There is a better likelihood for you and your fellow boomers to see some improvement, a positive change, if you collectively meet with one or both of the owners concerning your issue.  Be prepared to objectively explain the problem and to provide substantive suggestions on ways to resolve it.  Best of luck!

© 2011 Rozanne R. Worrell
 

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