Reader thinks new job hopefuls should be careful at holiday parties

Reader thinks new job hopefuls should be careful at holiday parties

Reader thinks new job hopefuls should be careful at holiday parties

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Rozanne "Roze" Worrell

Posted on December 18, 2012 at 5:31 PM

Dear Roze:

I hope you will print what I have to say.  As to be expected during the holiday season, so many of us are invited to a lot of parties, open houses, and other social events where alcohol is plentiful.  I have no problem with everyone enjoying themselves and having some libations but I think people, especially those who use these parties as places to get a hook or a lead on a job, need to keep things in check, if not be on their best behavior.  And in case you’re wondering, I’m one of those individuals who hires for my company, so as you can imagine, I have a lot of hooks.  I’ve seen and spoken to some real idiots in the past few weeks.  Some of them have tried to straighten up when they find out what I do, but as you can imagine, the damage is done.

Trying to do some damage control

Dear Trying to do some damage control:

Thank you for your email!  It reminds me of that old saying, “You can’t fix stupid.”  Good judgment is priceless during these festive times, and at all times for that matter.  Although I agree that individuals searching for jobs; wanting to change jobs; and/or needing contacts or recommendations should be extremely mindful of their conduct, I also believe those who are gainfully employed and secure in their jobs should be just as careful.  No one wants to put their jobs and/or their reputations at risk.  Furthermore, one never knows who may be at one of these festivities.  Even if the attendees may not be key contacts or the decision makers for their organizations, they could know the individuals who are.

Dear Roze:

I’ve been a stay-at-home mom for over six years, and I’ve been looking for a job for over a year now.  As you probably know, it hasn’t been easy, but I got closer with this last prospect in that I made it through two interviews before being told someone else was selected.  The guy who would have been my boss, Joe, did my initial interview and participated in the second one with his boss taking the lead.  Throughout the process, Joe was very communicative and positive, or so I thought, about my prospects.  When I didn’t get it, all he sent me was a brief, impersonal email, letting me know someone else was chosen.  He made it sound like it was because of where the other person lived, which made little sense to me.  I really wanted to ask Joe some questions when I emailed him back, or even call him to get more information.  My husband told me to just drop it, which I did, but it’s still really bothering me.  Do you think it would have been okay if I had contacted Joe to get some clarification?  

Needing clarification

Dear Needing clarification:

I believe your husband gave you some sound advice.  Oftentimes, individuals are limited in what they can communicate to job candidates because of one or more of the following things: 1. Their organization’s hiring policies; 2. The risk of a candidate misinterpreting the communication; 3. The risk of a candidate claiming discrimination based on one of the protected classes (age, gender, national origin, race, religion, and disability).  The only other thing I would have suggested is that if you have a good friend in the organization, you could contact that person to see if he/she could shed any light on the rationale for the hiring decision.

Hang in there! Best of luck!

© 2012 Rozanne R. Worrell

 

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