Manager fed up with young recruits' dress code disobedience

Manager fed up with young recruits' dress code disobedience

Manager fed up with young recruits' dress code disobedience

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by Rozanne "Roze" Worrell

WVEC.com

Posted on July 20, 2010 at 1:36 PM

Dear Roze:

We’re having a brutally hot summer, so I’ll be the first to admit that I would prefer not to have to wear a tie and long pants to work, but that goes against my agency’s dress code.  I’m in charge of one of my agency’s regional offices and the young people we’re hiring never cease to amaze me with the way they operate.  Maybe it’s a generational thing.  Regardless, it’s hard to deal with.  Recently, I got mad when two of our new young recruits showed up to my office for the first time wearing flip flops, and yes, no tie.  What were they thinking?  I asked them if they knew our dress code.  They said they did but thought it would be okay to be casually dressed since they were just “checking in.”  I sent them home to change.

Stick to the rules

Dear Stick to the rules:

I respect your position about the importance of following rules.  You made it clear that you will not tolerate the breaking of them.  That being said, it is important that your agency’s recruiter, or whoever deals with the new hires before they go to their assigned offices, emphasizes that there is no wiggle room with your agency’s dress code, regardless of weather conditions or the length and/or nature of their office visit. 

Dear Roze:

After a long search, I got a much needed full-time job with great pay, benefits, and a super boss.  For the past four years, I’ve had some part-time work for a nonprofit I’d like to keep.  The non-profit has monthly board meetings that last no more than two hours, which I’m required to attend.  I asked my new boss of two weeks if I could flex to make up the time I would miss on those days.  He said he couldn’t give me an answer until I’ve spent more time on the job, especially because the non-profit’s monthly meetings occur the same week my new employer always has a high-priority meeting I will be helping him prepare for.  I know I can do both.  How do I convince him?

Want it all

Dear Want it all:

Congratulations on your new job!  Do not jeopardize it!  I can understand why you would like to keep your part-time work, but do not push it.  You can help your boss with his decision by doing an excellent job for him.  Whatever the outcome, respectfully accept it.

Dear Roze:

I work for a small company where it’s all women including me.  Although none of us have the same job, most of our work requires that we interact and share information with each other on a regular basis.  And to be expected, some of us do a better job of it than others.  I’m good at sharing and much better than the others, but one of the women thinks this means I’m willing and wanting to be just as open about my personal life, which is the furthest from the truth.  My patience is wearing thin.  I can’t take her prying much longer, but I don’t know how to tell her without embarrassing her. 

Personal is personal

Dear Personal is personal:

There is no easy way to have this discussion.  Just be sure you are respectful and compassionate, and have it in private.  Explain that you have always preferred to keep your personal life separate from your work life; it has nothing to do with her.

© 2010 Rozanne R. Worrell

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