Job offer hinges on getting security clearance

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by Rozanne "Roze" Worrell

WVEC.com

Posted on December 24, 2009 at 10:41 AM

Updated Wednesday, Dec 30 at 3:01 PM


Dear Roze:

My husband recently applied for a job at Ft. Monroe as a contractor and got a conditional offer.  The offer was conditional on him getting his Top Secret clearance.  He filled out all the paperwork but didn’t get the clearance.  I think it’s because of our credit history.  We declared bankruptcy seven years ago.  He had a few minor credit issues but no judgments; and he has made payment arrangements with the companies to pay them in full by Dec. 31st.  He has never been convicted of a crime nor has he done any drugs.  I can’t figure out why he didn’t get the clearance.  Also, is he entitled to know why he was declined?  The company won’t tell him why he was declined.  It would help to know so if it is something fixable, we can fix it, if possible.

-Clearance confusion

Dear Clearance confusion:

Your husband must do a written request to the U.S. Office of Personnel Management’s (OPM) Federal Investigative Services to obtain information on the background investigation conducted for his security clearance.  The company he applied to would not have this information.  OPM’s Web site provides in detail what your husband needs to submit in order to gain access to his background investigation and/or to update his records with additional or supplemental information (http://www.opm.gov/extra/investigate/foiatips.asp).

Dear Roze:

I have a very competent employee that does excellent work.  She’s been on the job longer than anyone else in our department, so everything comes easy for her.  She comes in very early, way before anyone else, and cranks out all or most of her work before the official work day begins.  Consequently, sometimes, she won’t be in the office later in the day when everyone else is around, and other employees will ask where she is and why she’s not around.  It bothers me sometimes but I’ve chosen not to address it with her.  Instead, I mentioned it to my boss and he told me not to say or do anything because the woman always gets her work done and is available whenever anyone needs her.  What do you think?

-Dealing with early bird employee

Dear Dealing with early bird employee:

I agree with your boss, however, it appears that your office does not have but should have either a flex time program or specific guidelines/policies concerning work hours.  Either measure will ensure that no one wastes his/her valuable work time questioning the whereabouts of others.

Dear Roze:

I’m a male working at a unisex clothing store, and I'm having a tough time with a few of my female co-workers.  They’re very unprofessional in the way they address customers and me.  They even like to start unprovoked altercations with me.  Customers have made plenty of complaints and I’ve tried to resolve my issues by going through the proper channels, all the way up to our regional manager, but no one will do anything because these employees make the company money.  I’d quit but I'm in school and don't want to be inconvenienced in trying to find a job that works with my school schedule.  I have a bright future ahead of me and don't want to mess it up over some ignorant employees.  I think I've exhausted all my options.  Is there anything else I can do?

-Fed up with unprofessional co-workers

Dear Fed up with unprofessional co-workers:
 
Although it is disconcerting that your company chooses to ignore its employees’ unprofessional behavior because it is more concerned about the bottom line, it is not unusual.  I firmly believe that furthering your education is most important; therefore, I suggest that you not do anything that could jeopardize that.  If your situation does not improve, find the needed time to secure other work that will not conflict with your school schedule. 

© 2009 Rozanne R. Worrell

 

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