Intern irritated with colleague's dishonesty

Intern irritated with colleague's dishonesty

Intern irritated with colleague's dishonesty

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by Rozanne R. Worrell

WVEC.com

Posted on May 25, 2010 at 1:43 PM

Dear Roze:

I’ve been very fortunate to get an internship at a PR agency where I’d like to become a full-time employee when I graduate from college next year.  I work eight-hour days and sometimes even longer.  There’s another intern in the office who told me that she’s only working six-hour days because she has a yoga class every afternoon at 4:00.  She also let me know that she’s deceived the agency’s management and HR by telling them she can’t work full days because of some serious health problem one of her family members has.  I’m not only floored by her shameless lying, but I can’t believe she’s so bold and sure of herself that she would tell me about it.  I really wish she hadn’t told me because even though we work for different people, we’re compared a lot and she also wants to get a full-time paying job out of this internship.  I would hate to find out that she got hired and I didn’t.  She may be smart and capable but I have a major problem with her dishonesty.  I’m tempted to have what she’s doing “slip out.”  What do you think I should do?

Irritated intern in Hampton Roads

Dear Irritated intern in Hampton Roads:

As much as I sympathize with you, I suggest that you focus all of your time, talent, and energy on your work.  The other intern’s behavior is reprehensible but it is not something for you to tangle with.  Regardless of what happens to this other intern, hopefully, you will get a job offer because you have earned it.  Knock ‘em dead!  Best of luck!

Dear Roze:

I’ve recently been hired by a company that competes with my former employer.  This new employer, however, is much larger and has a bigger presence in the IT world than my former one.  Right now, we’re doing a networking event that is very similar to the ones I used to organize in my old job, but my new employer has never done this kind of an event.  We were very successful with these events at my old job, so I thought that my input would be wanted and expected.  Instead, every time I’ve tried to tell people what I did and how great things turned out, they’ve either ignored me or told me that they have it covered.  I know they’re considered the “big guns” in our industry and I know I’m the new guy, but I thought they hired me because of my experience and reputation.  How should I handle this?

Give me a chance

Dear Give me a chance:

Recognizing that you are a new hire, it is important that you earn your new colleagues’ trust and respect, which typically does not happen overnight.  You can accomplish this by consistently doing a good job.  Work hard and work smart.  It also makes sense to show deference to your new colleagues and to not come on too strong.  Ultimately, your work should speak for itself.  All this being said, realize that your situation is not unusual.  During my FBI career, I was transferred several times, and each time, despite my experience and good track record, it was like starting all over again.  I had to prove myself each time.  Hang in there!

© 2010 Rozanne R. Worrell

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