Worker fed up with selective responses to emails

Worker fed up with selective responses to emails

Worker fed up with selective responses to emails

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by Rozanne "Roze" Worrell

WVEC.com

Posted on July 17, 2012 at 3:45 PM

Updated Tuesday, Jul 17 at 4:31 PM

Dear Roze:

I don’t understand why people are so inconsiderate when it comes to responding to emails.  It’s obvious if someone asks questions or shares more than one piece of information in an email, he’s looking for some kind of response to all of those things.  It’s so frustrating when recipients of my emails are selective in what they respond to.  I get it that for whatever reason, they may not want to respond to everything, but I wonder how they would feel if they didn’t get thorough responses to the content in their emails.  I don’t care who you are or what you do; there’s no excuse for it.  Don’t you agree?

I want total responsiveness

Dear I want total responsiveness:

This is a problem I hear about more than I wish.  Bottom line, people should answer their incoming emails the way they want their emails responded to.  It is all about respect and The Golden Rule.  That being said, sometimes, we have to beat the non-responsive people at their own game.  Although it may not be the most efficient way to handle your email communications, I suggest you only ask one question or lay out only one matter in an email if you want a better shot at having it addressed.  It is more difficult to dodge a question or an issue when it is the only item in the communication. 

Dear Roze:

I’ve been a stay-at-home mom for over eight years, and I’ve just started to seriously look at getting back into the job market.  In my search, I came across something that initially looked appealing because it’s in an industry I’ve worked in and because it appears that there could be some flexibility with the hours.  When I called the owner, he liked that I had some experience selling his type of products, even though it was a while ago.  I got the feeling he wanted to hire me right then.  He told me to email my resume to him.  After he got it, he said he wanted to interview me and he even gave me a date and time to meet for it.  Again, he made it sound like I had the job if I wanted it, and he talked like he figured I was going to accept an offer from him.  He also emailed me some PDF files about his business, which he told me to review so we could discuss their content when we met.  I don’t know how to explain it, but I didn’t get a good feeling about him and I didn’t like the way he assumed I would take the job.  My gut is telling me that this is not a good fit for me.  I don’t want to go to the interview.  I never said yes or no to it, but I would say this guy thinks I’m on board since I didn’t say I couldn’t do it when he gave me the date and time for it.  What do you think I should do?  If I know this isn’t a job I want, why should I waste my time or his?

Prefer to go with my gut

Dear Prefer to go with my gut:

In as much as I believe in gut feelings, in your particular situation, I must encourage you to meet with this potential employer.  It is in your best interests to meet with him because it sounds like you led him to believe you would do the interview, and because you could benefit from the experience given your lack of any recent employment.  You will not only be honoring the potential employer’s expectations, but you will also gain some valuable interview experience, current knowledge of the industry, and possibly a good contact.  Furthermore, there is always a chance you could hear something in the interview that causes you to change your mind about working for him. 

© 2012 Rozanne R. Worrell
 

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