Experienced masseuse unhappy with training on off days

Experienced masseuse unhappy with training on off days

Experienced masseuse unhappy with training on off days

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by Rozanne "Roze" Worrell

WVEC.com

Posted on June 22, 2010 at 1:37 PM

Dear Roze:

I’m a massage therapist at a spa where employees’ experience is all over the map.  The owner requires that all employees participate in training regardless of how much experience any of us has.  He always schedules the training on my days off.  In our business, I only get paid when I work, so it’s impossible for this to work out for me.  I can’t afford to take time off when I regularly work and the owner won’t compensate any of us who loses a day off.  I’ve reminded him of my 20+ years in the business and, therefore, I don’t need the training, but there’s no negotiating with him.  He’s warned me that if I don’t attend, he has many people who want to take my place.  I need this job but I’m not happy.  Help!

No to training

Dear No to training:

I respect all the years you have as a massage therapist and I can understand why you feel the way you do about training, but I am a firm believer that all of us, regardless of our experience or age, can always learn something new.  Training is always a good thing, whether it exposes us to something new or serves as a refresher.  Approach the owner with this perspective and find out if the training is available on DVD (or VHS), and if not, request that it be videoed so you and others who are unable to attend can watch it at a more convenient time.

Dear Roze:

I'm positive God has a better place for me to work and I’m looking hard to find it.  The fact that I wake up every morning trying to come up with a good excuse for not going to work is proof that I need to get out.  I’m so stressed that my health has been affected.  I don't want potential employers talking to my current boss.  I’m very concerned that she won’t say anything nice.  I’d prefer to only list my previous supervisor (at the same company) who I worked for a lot longer.  What would you do if you were me?   
 
Must get a new job

Dear Must get a new job:

I would not want to raise any red flags.  If asked to list my current or most recent supervisor, I would give both names, emphasizing the difference in time I worked for both; but would request that these individuals be contacted only if a job offer appears certain since my job search was not public knowledge.

Dear Roze:

I had a job interview almost three weeks ago.  It didn’t go well at all.  Right after it was over, I was confident I wouldn’t hear from the company for a second interview or a job offer.  I have just realized that I didn’t follow-up with a thank you letter.  Is it too late to do one?  I know it won’t help me in any way but it bugs me that I didn’t do it.

Is it too late?

Dear Is it too late?:

Although I typically recommend that job seekers send handwritten notes within a week after their interviews, go ahead and send yours now.  In my mind, it is better late than never.  Given your evaluation of your interview, the note may not make a difference, but you will feel better with yourself for having done the right thing.  And if you ever cross paths with this person, it will be a less awkward encounter for you.

© 2010 Rozanne R. Worrell

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