Employee's praise of colleague could jeopardize promotion

Employee's praise of colleague could jeopardize promotion

Employee's praise of colleague could jeopardize promotion

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by Rozanne "Roze" Worrell

WVEC.com

Posted on February 26, 2013 at 5:01 PM

Dear Roze:

I need to vent.  It appears I screwed up even though I did what I thought was right.  A few months ago, the General Manager in my office asked me about a certain capability of a woman in my department.  You’ve probably been in a similar situation.  I could tell by the way he was asking, he didn’t care for the woman and wanted me to confirm his negative impressions.  I couldn’t do it.  I told the GM this woman was very good at doing this particular duty and that I’ve never had a problem with her.  He even asked me a second time in the same conversation, but I told him what I honestly thought.  Now, I’ve put in for a management slot in our company.  If selected, I would report to him.  I heard he’s going to endorse my competition even though I’m more qualified.  Any thoughts?

Had to be truthful

Dear Had to be truthful:

I understand why you are upset about this situation, but do you really want to work for someone like this?  It sounds like the General Manager prefers a yes-man versus an honest, independent thinker.  If in fact you are not selected, his loss will be your gain.

Dear Roze:

I have business dealings with a guy who doesn’t check his work emails, texts, or phone messages when he leaves the office, or at least, that’s what he says.  I know he has access to them from the road and his home; it’s just a personal choice he’s made.  Part of me respects his choice, understanding he doesn’t want to be bothered when he’s officially off the clock.  But another part of me thinks there are times when work requires our attention after regular hours, and such a situation happened in one of my dealings with him.  I needed to change an early morning meeting we had scheduled because I had taken ill.  I emailed, texted, and left a voice message on his cell phone.  Since he never responded, I had to find someone from my office that wouldn’t mind going to the coffee shop where we were supposed to meet at 7 AM, to let him know I wouldn’t be able to make it.  This person from my office told me it didn’t faze the guy in the least.  It would have been a big load off my mind to have the matter squared away the night before.  Do I say something or just let it go?

Deserved a response

Dear Deserved a response:

Whether or not you say something depends on several things.  Could you jeopardize your working relationship with this person if you call him out on his policy?  Will your comments even make a difference or fall on deaf ears?  Is this guy set in his ways or someone who is open to suggestions?

Oftentimes, we need to look at this kind of situation from the perspective of the other person.  Both of you are structured in your own ways.  He is more protective of his personal time than you are; and you seem to be more rigid when it comes to your work schedule.  I would not say anything regarding this particular instance, and would only speak up if his policy could negatively affect your work.  And please know I am much more like you but have had to learn to be more flexible and laid back when it comes to others’ work styles.  As an aside, it may not make you feel any better, but this guy may not have been fazed when you were unable to make the coffee shop meeting because he did in fact get your messages.  In keeping with his policy, he just chose not to acknowledge them.  Hang in there!

© 2013 Rozanne R. Worrell

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