Employee upset by boss’s lack of regard for rules

Employee upset by boss’s lack of regard for rules

Employee upset by boss’s lack of regard for rules

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by Rozanne "Roze" Worrell

WVEC.com

Posted on April 24, 2012 at 4:11 PM

Dear Roze:

I have no problem following my employer’s rules and policies.  Every one of us is given the company handbook to read and sign off of either before we start or the very first day of work.  To me, a lot of what we can and can’t do is common sense.  I’m just an employee, so I expect management to set a decent example, but I’m finding my expectations are unrealistic.  For example, I just heard through the grapevine how the big boss of our office had a mandatory management conference out of town with all of our company’s big bosses.  There are rumors going around the office that she signed in on the first day of the conference and snuck out after that to go to a spa for the rest of the week.  I can’t say for sure that this happened, but it wouldn’t surprise me if it did.  If any of us workers snuck out of one of our mandatory conferences, we’d be in big trouble, to put it lightly.  What a double standard!  What do you think about me reporting this to our company’s corporate office?  We have the option of submitting our complaints anonymously, but at this point in my career, I don’t care if she finds out it was me who ratted her out.  She’s the one who’s wrong.  She needs to get what’s coming to her!  What do you think?

Management should set an example

Dear Management should set an example:

You are absolutely right, if the rumors are accurate, the behavior of your big boss is unconscionable and she should be held accountable.  However, your information is based on rumors, not factual information.  I would only consider filing a complaint if you can verify what you have heard.  And if you are able to verify it, I would also consider filing it anonymously.

Dear Roze:

You’ve said on more than one occasion that you’re a big fanatic about people being on time.  I think you’re right to take issue with people who could care less how their lack of timeliness affects others.  Once a month, I have to attend a meeting as a representative for my employer.  The meeting location is in the same city at the same time every month, so those of us who have to travel a ways know we may run into traffic jams with the tunnels and/or the 264/64 interchange.  And yet I can be guaranteed that there will be some people who arrive late every time, and it’s usually the same handful of people.  So, instead of starting at 9:30 AM, the time we’re supposed to start, we start at least 15 minutes later, and even then, everyone isn’t present.  So, we always end up having to repeat some of what was said earlier in the meeting and, of course, always running later than we should.  I’ve asked the chairperson to say something about this, but he doesn’t want to.  I’m not sure if it’s because these meetings aren’t mandatory and it’s no big deal to him if we run late, or if it’s because he doesn’t want to rub some of these latecomers the wrong way.  I’d like to say something about it, but I think it would tick him off.  Do you have any suggestions?

Be considerate of others

Dear Be considerate of others:

Yes, I cannot deny I am a punctuality freak.  Being on time for any kind of interaction with one or more individuals is a matter of respect.  Whether or not a meeting is mandatory should have no bearing on people’s punctuality.  Furthermore, tardy people should realize the potential negative reflection of being late can cast on them.  Ideally, your colleagues should adjust their departure times to accommodate for possible traffic tie-ups.

It is a shame the chairman has chosen not to encourage people to get to the meetings on time.  You can casually mention to the chairman your willingness to bring up the time issue at the next meeting.  Let him know your soft approach would be to ask everyone if they would like to start the meetings later, since everyone is not arriving at the designated time.  If he does not take you up on your offer, I would not push it.  Sadly, you will need to adapt your schedule to accommodate for the other attendees’ lack of consideration.

© 2012 Rozanne R. Worrell
 

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