Employee sick of hypocrytical management

Employee sick of hypocrytical management

Employee sick of hypocrytical management

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by Rozanne "Roze" Worrell

WVEC.com

Posted on December 22, 2010 at 8:20 AM

Updated Monday, Jan 3 at 3:38 PM

Dear Roze:

I’m so sick of my company’s management leading by, “Do as I say, not as I do.”  We have a policy that states that no one can take more than one week off at a time, so no one can ever take the two weeks off that fall between Christmas and New Year’s.  I wouldn’t have a problem with this rule if everyone followed it.  But every year, one or more of our supervisors, including the one I report to, take off both weeks.  Isn’t that despicable?  I know nothing can be done about this, but I really needed to vent.

-Management ruins holiday spirit again

Dear Management ruins holiday spirit again:

I am so sorry that your management does not see and/or care about the error of its ways.  The supervisors’ duplicitous behavior can in no way help your and your co-workers’ morale or productivity.  Their disregard for all of you and their unabashed arrogance are disheartening to say the least.  I sympathize with all of you and hope you can focus your attention on the other things in your lives that make the holiday season special.

Dear Roze:

A very upsetting thing happened to me with one of my colleagues, someone I’ve always thought I had a decent relationship with.  We had been talking over the phone and when we ended our conversation, she thought she had “hung up” but hadn’t.  I could hear her talking to someone else about me. I wish I could say that what I heard was nice but it wasn’t.  Her remarks floored me; I’m really hurt.  Now, I find it hard to talk to her or even be around her, but the idea of letting her know I overheard her remarks makes me squeamish.  I’m scared as to how she would react.  What should I do?

-Overheard and hurt

Dear Overheard and hurt:
You can do one of two things.  You can either say nothing but be well-aware of this person’s two-faced behavior; or you can respectfully confront her on what you overheard, which I would only do if you are sure this person is a real friend.  If you decide to do the latter, be prepared for a defensive and/or negative reaction, recognizing that no one likes to be put on the spot even if it is justified.  Best of luck with whichever way you decide to handle it.

Dear Roze:

I’m gainfully employed but I hate my boss.  For so many reasons I have no respect for her, so, when I have the time, I search for other employment.  I just received a phone message from a company I think would be a good fit for me.  The message came from one of their executives saying that their HR would be reaching out for me.  I’m also an executive and I’m seeking an executive level position.  I don’t want to talk to their HR.  As an executive, I shouldn’t have to.  Only executives should be interviewing me.  To be blunt, I can’t stand them.  The only time I should have to talk to HR is if I accept a job offer and their HR wants to review my benefits package and other administrative matters.  I’m so disappointed because I really thought this company would be a good fit for me.  What do you think?

-No tolerance for HR

Dear No tolerance for HR:

If you truly want a new job, I suggest that you forgo your prejudices against HR and graciously agree to comply with whatever process this company and any other company may have in order to be considered for employment.

© 2010 Rozanne R. Worrell

 

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