Employee not a fan of dressing up for Halloween

Employee not a fan of dressing up for Halloween

Employee not a fan of dressing up for Halloween

Print
Email
|

by Rozanne "Roze" Worrell

WVEC.com

Posted on October 25, 2011 at 1:10 PM

Dear Roze:

I’m sorry, but I’m not in grade school anymore and cannot believe that my boss is pushing everyone in our office to dress up for Halloween next week, and is even making it a competition.  I consider myself a very good worker and a team player, but I’m not the kind of person who likes getting into a costume.  It’s just not my thing.  I don’t think my boss should take issue with those of us who prefer not to do it, but it appears that he won’t be happy with those of us who don’t participate.  I’d appreciate your thoughts on this.

Not a fan of dressing up

Dear Not a fan of dressing up:

I respect your desire not to dress up, but I can also understand and appreciate your boss’s efforts to have everyone participate.  Oftentimes, management facilitates these types of events as a way to boost employees’ morale without requiring a significant investment of their time or money.  The boss should make sure that everyone knows that participation is optional and that he has no problem with anyone who chooses not to, recognizing that there may be individuals like you who will have no interest in dressing up and/or those individuals who could feel uncomfortable or offended because of their religious or personal beliefs.  

Dear Roze:

My daughter spent this past summer working for a company she would like to work for full-time when she graduates next spring.  She received positive feedback while she was there and just now, she received an email advising her that the reviews on her performance were all positive and that they’re looking for a spot for her.  I was very pleased to hear this and asked her if she had responded to this email, showing her appreciation and interest.  Not only had she not sent an email back, but she was in no rush to do it even though she wants to work for them.  She thinks I’m worrying about nothing and I’m thinking she’s going to lose this great opportunity if she doesn’t respond immediately.  What do you think?

Parent urging timely response

Dear Parent urging timely response:

I wholeheartedly agree with you.  Given our struggling economy, college graduates are facing stiff competition for jobs more than ever.  I, too, would have strongly encouraged your child to move on her response so as not to jeopardize her employment chances with the company.  A timely response may not increase her chances for landing a job, but an untimely one could hurt them.

Dear Roze:

In my office, the work hours are 9 AM to 5 PM for all of management, and the employees, of which I’m one, work either 6 AM to 2 PM, 8 AM to 4 PM, or 4 PM to midnight. Regardless of your position, everyone is expected to be punctual.  We don’t have a punch clock or time sheets, but everyone knows not to show up late or leave early.  And yet everyone in our department is well aware that our boss never gets to work on time, and we’re talking as much as two hours late.  I understand she’s a supervisor and can get things done from home or wherever she is because of technology, but so could we, her employees.  It appears that she thinks that since she’s the boss, the scheduled work hours don’t apply to her and that whatever she does is none of our business.  And yet, if one of us is just a little late, there will be hell to pay.  To see her do this day in and day out bugs the daylights out of us.  We’re seriously thinking about making a complaint to her boss about it.

Not setting a good example

Dear Not setting a good example:

It is unfortunate that your boss has a “do as I say, not as I do” attitude about her actions.  She, obviously, does not understand or care how her behavior is affecting the morale of her employees and may also be hurting her reputation with the other supervisors and the employees that do not report to her.  Taking your complaint to her superior or to your HR department may resolve the matter, but be prepared for some initial backlash.  The other thing to be mindful of is that your boss may have permission to arrive late or to work from home in the mornings and has chosen, ill-advisedly, not to communicate this special accommodation to her staff.

© 2011 Rozanne R. Worrell

Print
Email
|