Employee dissatisfied with new boss's attitude

Employee dissatisfied with new boss's attitude

Employee dissatisfied with new boss's attitude

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by Rozanne "Roze" Worrell

WVEC.com

Posted on March 29, 2011 at 3:18 PM

Dear Roze:

I’ve got a new boss from hell.  Our unit’s morale hasn’t been good since he arrived, but he made matters much worse when he sent all of us a brutal email that included this: “If you decide to come to work, but decide you don’t want to be here, then please put in a leave slip and excuse yourself.”  What was he thinking?  The morale has only sunk lower and our respect for him is non-existent.  We tried talking to him.  He gets very defensive and doesn’t hear a word we’re saying.  Is he a jerk or what?

Working for a jerk

Dear Working for a jerk:

I am a firm believer that a supervisor’s biggest asset is his/her people.  Based on this premise, your supervisor’s behavior and attitude are perfect examples of the ways one should not manage his/her direct reports.  I would never recommend that a supervisor email or write such a directive to the people who report to him/her.  I cannot help but think there is more to this story than your email provided.  All that being said, if there is no possibility for your boss to realize that he would be most effective if he talked with and showed compassion for the employees who appear to be struggling with their work, and since you have already tried to talk to him, then you and a couple of your co-workers should take the matter to his boss or HR.  Best of luck! 

Dear Roze:

I was really surprised and upset by what I heard from a national network’s financial expert concerning appropriate work compensation.  She recommended that people be willing to change jobs if they don’t get the raise they asked for after having done significant research on what competitors are paying for the same work.  She made it sound like it was so easy to do.  If she hasn’t noticed, we’re going through a recession and jobs aren’t so easy to come by. 

National expert is off base

Dear National expert is off base:

I am familiar with the financial news segment you saw on TV.  It had to do with action items individuals can take in order to save $1 million dollars for their retirement.  The expert identified five steps people should take in order to maximize their savings.  The one you are referring to was her first strategy:  “Be paid what you’re worth.”   Although I totally agree that workers should be valued and properly compensated, the expert’s suggestion for people to be willing to change jobs if they do not get the salary increase they request was shortsighted, to say the least.  She did not consider individuals’ personal circumstances as well as the state of our economy.  All too often, these commentators are given a very short period of air time to present their advice, which causes them to give more sound bites than thorough, well thought-out information.

Dear Roze:

I had a job interview where the interviewer, an executive director, advised me that in the next phase of the interview process I should be prepared to show him and other executives, including their general counsel, how I can handle different situations with different people in our industry, as well as my ability to “problem solve.”  OMG – “problem solve!”  It sounds like they’re treating this like a college entrance process.  I’m applying to be a part of their management team but this process seems so juvenile.  I find their interview process beneath my credentials and wonder if this is a sign of what’s to come if I’m hired.  What do you think?
 
Distraught over interview process

Dear Distraught over interview process:

I see nothing wrong with the organization’s interview process.  The ability to problem solve is a critical skill that one should be prepared to demonstrate, especially when applying for a management position.  Take a step back from the situation and reassess what you are trying to accomplish with these interviews.  Hopefully, you will come to understand the importance of what this organization is asking of you.

© 2011 Rozanne R. Worrell

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