Employee angry about retiring manager's backstabbing

Employee angry about retiring manager's backstabbing

Employee angry about retiring manager's backstabbing

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by Rozanne "Roze" Worrell

WVEC.com

Posted on August 31, 2011 at 9:05 AM

Updated Wednesday, Aug 31 at 9:05 AM

Dear Roze:

I’d like your opinion.  I work in a small office.  Our general sales manager retired at the end of June.  There was a big retirement luncheon for him that cost everyone $25 bucks.  I turned in my money at least a month before the event, way before I learned from a good source that this head honcho had been slamming me and my sales numbers behind my back.  I’ve had a solid relationship with him, so this really floored me.  To my face, he was always decent, nothing but positive.  I knew he wasn’t perfect, but who is?  And as far as I knew, up until this point, he had never backstabbed me; at least, that’s what I thought.  So, I sucked it up and went to the luncheon anyway.  A couple of my buddies have said I shouldn’t have gone.  What do you think I should have done?

Angry over head honcho’s slamming

Dear Angry over head honcho’s slamming:

Do not lose sight of the fact that the information you received was secondhand information.  Although it would not have been easy, I would have suggested that you respectfully confront the executive with what you had heard since you thought you had a good relationship with him. Then, based on his response and attitude, you could have decided whether or not you wanted to attend his affair. 

Dear Roze:

I’m in business with three people I not only consider to be my close friends but they’re like family to me too.  We’ve been through so much with each other.  I would never expect any of us to do anything major without buy-in from the others, but one of our partners made a HUGE move without consulting with the rest of us.  Three of us are massage therapists and our fourth partner handles all of our administrative and logistical needs.  We created a policy when we formed our partnership that each of us massage therapists would pitch in a set amount of money from our earnings every week to cover our fourth partner’s salary.  This problem partner found a temp to fill in for one of us who is recovering from major surgery but didn’t tell the temp that she would have to follow this policy.  So, when the rest of us informed the temp about it, she told us flat out that she wouldn’t do it and the problem partner is okay with that.  This situation is maddening on so many levels.  We don’t understand why our partner didn’t confer with us before bringing this person onboard, or why she didn’t tell this person about our policy.  Even worse, our partner doesn’t think she did anything wrong and she’s okay with the temp not following the policy.  Our fourth partner is really hurt by this – personally and financially!  Help!

Partnership in peril

Dear Partnership in peril:

If you have not left out any critical information pertaining to this situation, the partner who brought in the temporary worker is in the minority.  I see no reason why you and the other two partners do not tell her that the temp can stay only if she follows this policy.  Give this partner the option to personally explain this to the temp.  If she prefers not to give the temp the news, then the three of you should meet with the temp and explain the situation.  If the temp decides to leave, it may cause some disruption with the business, but it will be worth it in the long run. 

On a side note, if it has not already been done, have this policy and all your other policies and rules put in writing.  Be sure that this document, along with a verbal overview, is provided to anyone considering employment with you and your partners.  Hopefully, in time, you will find another temp who has no problem following that particular policy or any of your other policies and rules; and you and your partners will have mended the fences and be working together more like a team.  Best of luck!

© 2011 Rozanne R. Worrell
 

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