Contractor floored by former employer's request

Contractor floored by former employer's request

Contractor floored by former employer's request

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WVEC.com

Posted on August 3, 2010 at 1:11 PM

Dear Roze:

I decided to terminate one of my contracts before it was supposed to end because my relationship with the company’s head honcho had deteriorated beyond repair.  I’m an independent contractor and my fees, which were agreed upon in a written contract signed by both of us, became an issue for her.  She wanted to decrease my hourly rate but I had already given her a break when she initially contracted my services.  But instead of being professional about it, she started sending me negative emails criticizing my performance left and right; and she hired a full-time employee who was told he would only be performing administrative functions, but she gave him some of the work I was contracted to do.  So even though my hourly rate stayed the same, she decreased my income by having this new guy do some of my work.  To make matters worse, he had no experience with what she was having him do, so he had to constantly contact me for help.  So, I was floored when this executive had the audacity to ask if I would be available to answer any questions the new guy may have about the work he was doing in my place when she emailed me to let me know my last check was ready for pick up.  I’m actually torn because I like the guy and feel sorry for him.  She’s having him do things he wasn’t hired to do and that are a lot more difficult.  Do you think I should be available?

Floored by request

Dear Floored by request:

I understand your sympathy and concern for the employee who has to fill your shoes, but his situation is not your problem.  I suggest that you respectfully decline the executive’s request.  Hopefully, the new employee will stand up for himself and request training and just compensation for the increase, both in amount and complexity, in his responsibilities.

Dear Roze:

Because I could no longer tolerate my employer’s policies, I believed it was in my best interest to resign from my job.  I saw the writing on the wall; I’m quite sure I saved myself from getting fired.  Fortunately, I was able find a new job since my profession isn’t hurting as much as others. But, I have a score I want to settle before I start my new job.  There’s a rat in my old office and I know for a fact that she snitched on me and that she snitches on others on a regular basis.  I want her to know that I was on to her.  I knew she was going to management about me and others.  I don’t want her to think she got away with it.  I know I have to keep my cool if I call her out, but I realize there’s a risk I could get riled up, which is why I’m emailing you.  What do you think I should do?

Give it to the rat

Dear give it to the rat:

Given that you did not leave your job under the best circumstances and given that you will remain in the same profession, I do not consider a confrontation with the office rat to be in your best interest.  I understand how such an encounter could be liberating for you, but it could also backfire given the rat’s apparent positive relationship with your old employer’s management.  I am a firm believer in not burning bridges.  Put all your energy into your new job.  Best of luck!

© 2010 Rozanne R. Worrell
 

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