Business owner wants to spread holiday giving attitude

Business owner wants to spread holiday giving attitude

Business owner wants to spread holiday giving attitude

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by Rozanne "Roze" Worrell

WVEC.com

Posted on November 23, 2010 at 2:52 PM

Dear Roze:

I’ve heard that you’re real big on volunteer work.  As the owner of a mid-size company, I’m strongly encouraging my employees to give back to our community by giving of themselves this Thanksgiving.  I don’t ask any of them to make a financial donation.  I’ve suggested that they do something like work in a soup kitchen or any place that will be giving a meal to those unable to afford one on their own; or to go to a place like a hospital or nursing home and visit with people who will be spending the holiday all alone.  In return, all who participate get the Friday after Thanksgiving off with pay, and it doesn’t count against their existing paid vacation time.  This is the third year I’ve done this with my staff.  Participation is almost 100% and quite a few have told me that they don’t even need an incentive to do it.  Do you mind sharing my email with your other readers?

Business owner pushing for true giving

Dear Business owner pushing for true giving:

With much respect and enthusiasm I gladly share your email with my entire readership.  I hope others will follow your lead.  Bravo!  Happy Thanksgiving!

Dear Roze:

When my boss hired me, we got along very well, but she hasn’t liked me for quite some time; and I don’t know how much more of her I can take.  I realize that not everyone is going to get along or like each other at work, but she makes it personal and treats me unprofessionally.  I think she feels threatened by me, especially since her boss has given me praise about my work in front of her.  An example of her meanness happened the other day.  Several of us had a project on the downtown mall in our community and the police department had a presence.  I struck up a friendly conversation with one of the officers.  There was no personal agenda on my part whatsoever; it was a totally professional interaction, but I overheard my boss snicker to one of my colleagues, who also works for her, that she was appalled to see me flirting with the officer.  My boss spoke so loudly that it was obvious that she wanted me to hear her outrageous accusation.  I about lost it but kept my cool.  It took everything in me not to give her a piece of my mind.  I’d love to quit but can’t afford to.  How do I continue to work for her when I can’t even stand to look at her?  Any guidance would be so appreciated.

I’ve had enough

Dear I’ve had enough:

I sympathize with you and understand that you have been through a lot.  I also realize that this situation is complicated and that, most likely, there is a lot more involved than what you were able to email to me.  All that being said, what I am about to suggest will not be easy or comfortable for you.  It requires that you be a bigger person than your boss so you can keep your sanity and have a chance at salvaging this work relationship.  Request a one-on-one with your boss.  Your attitude and tone are critical during this discussion.  It is important that you come off sincere and that you are not accusatory.  Start the conversation by telling her that you want to improve your relationship with her.  Ask her what you can do to help mend it.  If you are aware of things you could do or do differently, advise her of your plans to do those things.  The key is to convince her that you are willing to do your part to get the relationship back on track.  If this meeting does not help the situation, hopefully, you will have some peace of mind knowing that you made an earnest effort.  Best of luck!  Hang in there!

© 2010 Rozanne R. Worrell
 

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