Worker has bleak outlook on new year

Worker has bleak outlook on new year

Worker has bleak outlook on new year

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by Rozanne "Roze" Worrell

WVEC.com

Posted on January 2, 2013 at 4:34 PM

Updated Wednesday, Jan 2 at 5:19 PM

Dear Roze:

I wish I could say I’m charged up and ready to take on the New Year, but I’m just not feeling it.  I can’t think of anything to be excited about.  I don’t like my job and I really don’t like my boss.  And everyone I work with is so lame.  And let’s not forget that it’s quite likely my taxes will be going up, gas prices are already creeping back up, and of course, my paycheck is staying right where it was in 2012.  Yep, can’t see how all this is supposed to make me feel great and psyched for 2013.  So, Roze, what can you tell me I haven’t already heard that will make me feel differently?

Happy New Year - NOT

Dear Happy New Year - NOT: 

I wish I could say I have something unique to share with you, but what I have to say is probably something you have heard on more than one occasion.  Our attitudes towards our situations can have a huge impact on how things work out for us.  Just like the old saying goes, “When life gives you lemons, make lemonade.”  It is not only important for us to do what we can with what we have, but to find a way to see the good in things and turn them into a positive.  Positive thinking actually means approaching life's challenges with a positive outlook.  It does not necessarily mean avoiding or ignoring the bad things; instead, it involves making the most of potentially bad situations.  The more we try to make the best of our situations, the more likely they will turn around.  When we project a positive attitude, the more positivity will come our way.  We need to recognize the powerful force of our attitudes, and use it to our advantage.

Best of luck!  Hang in there!

Dear Roze:

Over the holidays, I received a request via email from an old colleague.  Until last summer, I worked with her for about six years.  We got along fine but we never socialized outside of work, and there were actually a few occasions where her actions at work rubbed me the wrong way.  After I resigned, the only communications I got from her were the occasional mass emails involving animals, and a Christmas card a couple of weeks ago.  She was under the impression I could help her with something because of a skill set she thought I had.  She was uncharacteristically Saccharine sweet in her email, probably because she realized her request was rather bold since she hadn’t really kept in touch with me.  The skill was one I acquired for a job I had before I worked with her, but I’m no longer proficient in it.  I was very nice when I wrote her back.  I wanted to convey that even though I wouldn’t be able to help her, it wasn’t because I didn’t want to.  I’m writing you because I need to vent.  This woman didn’t have the decency to acknowledge my response.  I’m sure it’s because she didn’t get the answer she was looking for.  What is it with people?

Looking for some common decency

Dear Looking for some common decency:

I completely understand your disappointment.  Without question, your former colleague should have responded to your email even though it did not convey the message she was looking for.  From a professional perspective, it is disheartening that she did not think of, or worse, did not care enough to acknowledge your response.  I wish she had followed The Golden Rule.  I hope she does not need to ask you for another favor in the future.

© 2013 Rozanne R. Worrell

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