Administrative assistant feels used, even after leaving job

Administrative assistant feels used, even after leaving job

Administrative assistant feels used, even after leaving job

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WVEC.com

Posted on September 11, 2012 at 3:54 PM

 Dear Roze:

 
I was an administrative assistant for a non-profit organization for over seven years.  I felt as though I was well liked by most, and had a great reputation for always being available and consistently doing a great job.  So, when I gave my notice, everyone was surprised and appeared upset.  But I had had enough.  I needed to work in a saner place, a place where I would be appreciated more, and a place with a better compensation package.  My immediate boss and a few others asked if I would reconsider and stay even though they couldn’t pay me more.  Although I didn’t tell them, if they hadn’t made me feel so used and taken for granted all the time, I’d probably have stayed despite the meager pay.  It’s been over three months since I left and no one has ever called, emailed, or texted me until now.  One of the executives just sent me an email with a document he wanted me to review.  He didn’t even try to mask the purpose of his email except to say I was one of the few he trusted to review it before he sent it out to the organization’s donors.  Shoot, it’s more than obvious he’s using me.  What do you think I should do?  Should I just ignore his email?  Should I give him a piece of my mind?  I’m irked beyond belief, but I strongly believe in this non-profit’s mission.  As an aside, I have another job, so it’s not like I’m looking for things to do.
 
Irked beyond belief
 
Dear Irked beyond belief:
 
I sure hope you have not and will not spend any time on that document!  Although I understand your attachment to the non-profit’s cause, it is obvious that this guy is attempting to take advantage of your good nature and will continue to do so as long as you permit it.  Respectfully acknowledge receipt of his email and the document and let him know you have no revisions.  He can interpret your lack of revisions in whatever way he chooses.   
 
Dear Roze:
 
I don’t want anyone sucking up to me, but when I entrust someone with my money and rely on their advice regarding investments, I expect them to be available during the various stages of the deal.  My agent was no where to be found at the closing of a strip mall I was purchasing.  I left her a couple of messages on her cell phone, which was the only number I ever called her on, but I didn’t hear from her until ten days after the closing.  I called her company’s corporate office the day before the closing to make sure nothing bad had happened to her and learned she was on vacation.  When she finally called me, she told me she didn’t think it was necessary for her to be at the closing because she had taken care of all the necessary paperwork she was responsible for.  I was livid.  Besides not telling me ahead of time she wasn’t planning to be at the closing, I still can’t believe she never checked her phone messages, and if she did, wouldn’t feel compelled to return any of my calls to put me at ease.  It’s like she knew she had done what she needed to do for the commission, and didn’t care beyond that.  I have some other investments in the queue but don’t feel comfortable working with her.  I’m thinking of getting another agent.  What do you think?
 
Livid over the no-show
 
Dear Livid over the no-show:
 
Wow, this is so unconscionable!  It is hard to believe your agent’s attitude and behavior.  In real estate, your clients are your lifeblood.  I cannot imagine why your agent did not let you know ahead of time about her travel plans, offer to have someone pinch hit for her at the closing, or even suggest a different closing date.  Regardless, she should have been much more communicative and sympathetic.  Changing agents is not a bad idea, but I would be sure to calmly explain to your current agent why you will no longer be using her.  Hopefully, this experience will teach her some valuable lessons.  When you select your new agent, make sure that person understands and agrees with your expectations.  Best of luck!
 
© 2012 Rozanne R. Worrell

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