Employees consider confronting boss about co-worker's raise

Employees consider confronting boss about co-worker's raise

Employees consider confronting boss about co-worker's raise

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by Roze Worrell

WVEC.com

Posted on February 25, 2014 at 7:06 AM

Dear Roze:

We’re not happy! Our boss gave three others and me extra duties outside of our job descriptions when another employee left the company. We understood he wasn’t going to replace this employee so we didn’t mind getting the extra responsibilities, but it has come to light that one of us, not me, also got a nice raise with these extra duties. The rest of us didn’t get a dime. We all know what each of us makes and it’s basically the same amount. We also know our boss can do whatever he wants since he owns the business but that doesn’t make us feel any better. We think the woman who got the raise is his favorite and that’s why she got a raise. Doesn’t he know we would find out? Doesn’t he realize what this does to our morale and loyalty to him and his company? What do you think about the three of us who didn’t get the raise asking our boss about it?

Where’s our raise?

Dear Where’s our raise?:

In as much as I understand your unhappiness and sympathize with you and your co-workers, I also realize, as it sounds like you do, your boss, the owner of the company, can do whatever he chooses as long as his actions are not discriminatory. To determine whether or not to question him about your co-worker’s raise, you and your co-workers should carefully consider a few things. One, verify that this co-worker did in fact receive a raise; two, make sure your extra duties are equivalent in complexity and difficulty to the ones assigned to this co-worker; three, be very sure your boss is the kind of person who will not get defensive if confronted about his actions; and four, but by no means least, do not forget that so many companies are doing more with less since the recession. You and your co-workers do not want to jeopardize your positions in the company. Of course, each of you always has the option to seek other employment, but you want to maintain control of this option. And if any of you decide to leave, do not give your notices until you have secured other jobs.

Dear Roze:

I got a promotion that took effect the first week in January. I received a tremendous amount of training to do this new job, which cost my employer significant bucks. I had been thinking about retiring before I got this promotion, but I wasn’t absolutely sure, so I didn’t say anything. Now, having done the job for a little over two months and having talked it over with my wife, I know without a doubt I want to retire once I’m eligible, which is at the end of June. I’m concerned, however, I will burn some bridges when I submit my retirement papers because it has to happen so soon. I’m required to give a 90-day notice, which means I would have to turn my papers in by the end of March. What do you think I should do?

Don’t want to burn any bridges

Dear Don’t want to burn any bridges:

Even though I understand your concern, you should do what is in the best interests of you and your family. I imagine you are not the first person nor will you be the last who retires from this organization shortly after it has invested considerable money and training. It probably goes without saying, but since you have asked for my advice, be sure to handle the submission of your papers with utmost professionalism. You must also not lose sight of the fact that your organization would not hesitate to get rid of you or any other employee it determined should be terminated. No one is irreplaceable.

© 2014 Rozanne R. Worrell

 

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